Angel Hair Phenomenon

Angel Hair
Angel hair or siliceous cotton is a substance said to be dispersed from UFOs as they fly overhead. It is made up of silicon threads that rain down on to the earth, but reach out to touch it and it will almost unusually vanish before your eyes. It is a world wide phenomenon with the most regular occurrences from North America, New Zealand, Australia, and western Europe. There is no known proof for what causes this substance, or even what it is made up of. Because of its sensitive nature, it has been difficult to collect, and to analyse as it is subject to contamination from car exhaust fumes, and even human contact, which could skew the chemical results. The most reported incidence occurred in Oloron, France in 1952. On October 27, 1954, Gennaro Lucetti and Pietro Lastrucci stood on the balcony of a hotel in St. Mark's Square in Venice and saw two shining spindles flying across the sky leaving a trail of angel hair. In the Portuguese city of Evora on November 2, 1959, angel hair was collected and analyzed at the microscope by local school director and later by armed forces technicians and scientists of the University of Lisbon. Conclusions were not possible although it was formed, apparently, by a small organism featuring 10 arms stretching from a central core. It was advanced that it could be a single-celled organism of some kind. This event followed the sighting, by the population of the city, of several ufos. Angel hair was also spotted in the same day, at the Air Force Base of Sintra, several kilometers to the north.

Explanations related to UFO include:

  • Ionized air may be sleeting off the electromagnetic field that surrounds a UFO.
  • Excess energy converted into matter.
  • The usage by UFOs of a G-field would cause heavy atoms in ordinary air to react among themselves and produce a kind of precipitate that falls to the ground and disappears as the ionization decreases.

Angel Hair Phenomenon Angel Hair Phenomenon Reviewed by Elvis G. on 8:32:00 AM Rating: 5
Theme images by hdoddema. Powered by Blogger.
Web Analytics Top science blogs Follow me on Blogarama